fbpx

Category Archives for "Patient Care"

Do you Struggle getting patients to your WORKSHOPS?

By Dr. Russ Rosen | Communications , Patient Care

Has this ever happened to you?

At the start of the day, you have 10 people scheduled into your workshop. You’re pumped about the opportunity to share the chiropractic message and are looking forward to providing boat loads of value. But…as the day goes on you can hear your CA on the phone taking call after call as your patients continue to come up with excuses about why they can’t make it to your workshop tonight. By the time the workshop comes around your delivering your talk to 2 people….arghhhh!

If this sounds familiar then know that you’re not alone. This scenario plays out in this form or very similar ones in chiropractic offices around the globe!

Continue reading

What to do when a patient says, “I can’t afford your care.”

By Dr. Russ Rosen | Patient Care , Patient issues

If you’ve been discovering how to run a profitable chiropractic business for more than 5 minutes, then a patient has told you that they need to stop or reduce care because they could no longer afford it!

This exact situation tends to impact us as chiropractors on so many levels. For many of us, it’s like an arrow to the heart and brings up all sorts of issues around value and self worth.

I want to share with you the two big mistakes chiropractors make when confronting this situation and share my top strategies for getting to the real reason your patient wants to stop care.

Continue reading

Feeling versus Function (Improving Chiropractor Communication)

By Dr. Russ Rosen | Patient Care , Patient Strategies

As a chiropractor, it’s sometimes challenging to get our patients to understand what we REALLY offer. If they did, they’d want it, every single time. My chiropractic coaching experience has given me some clarity on the matter that I’d like to share with you.

So where’s the disconnect?

One of the great challenges I find is that most chiropractors never find out what the patient actually wants before we tell them how much care they need. Chiropractor communication as a root cause leads to all sorts of problems with your practice.

Continue reading

Capitalizing on the Limited Scope of Other Chiropractors Near You

By Dr. Russ Rosen | Patient Care , Patient issues

I just had one of my coaching clients send me this email today.

“I had a new pt today from my talk. He’s a big guy, poor lifestyle in his early 30s. He told me he is afraid (brought to tears) he is not going to be around for his 9 week old son, in fact he wakes up everyday scared. He was there because of what I said at the talk at his office and he was crying out for help. It brought tears to me also. This guy gets the whole story and big picture and seems very motivated!

My dilemma is that he has been under chiro care for neck and back type symptoms which have cleared up, but his chiropractor never talked about the importance of clearing up the nerve interference and subluxations and made no mention of how important it is for this guy to live a reasonable lifestyle.  Again he was at the talk I gave the other day and of course I talked about how important the nervous system is and living a reasonable lifestyle and that’s why he came to see me. So his neck and back are feeling better however I tried to hint that his function will take longer. I would recommend more care not less, haven’t seen x-rays yet but scans especially HRV is not good. 

I suppose what I want to ask you, in a long winded way, is, is there anything different you would say or do, or really highlight? He told me he can be impatient and if things don’t happen quickly he moves on. This is a long term project in my view, I’m scared of what will happen to him if he doesn’t commit. He needs to understand the changes he wants to notice are ones that will probably take some time and a bit of patience will be needed.”

Have you ever run into this?

Continue reading

Do you ever have a difficult time telling your patients the truth?

By Dr. Russ Rosen | Patient Care , Patient issues , Patient Strategies

I was having a conversation with a doctor the other day who was having a challenge just telling the patients her truth.

She said that when it came to things like telling the patient how much care she thinks they really need or asking for referrals or a whole host of other things, she was really having a tough time.

The last thing she wanted her patients to think is that she is in it for the money.

Now the truth of the matter is this: I have had this same conversation with many doctors over the years. It may be about telling the patient what they need to get to a certain level of health, or asking for referrals. It may be telling the patient that if they really want this to resolve they will need to eat better, or deal with stress or get some exercise. It could be telling patients that if they don’t make certain changes like their frequency of care they really are not going to get the results that they want etc.

Continue reading

I want you to go home and sleep on it.

By Dr. Russ Rosen | Communications , Patient Care , Patient Strategies

When coaching doctors through the report of findings process, we hear them say thing like

“I try to show them the care plan I would recommend and then tell them that I don’t want them to make a decision today. The last thing we want to do is pressure them to do anything. So we want you to go home and sleep on it and come back next time and let me know if you would like to do a program of care or just pay per visit for now.”

That all makes sense, doesn’t it? When I hear this kind of statement, I find that the doctor is in one of two categories: they are non-assertive and “roll over” when a patient pushes back (sometimes referred to as the O.K. Corral) or they’re tired of the high-pressure sales tactics that they’ve been told they HAVE to use. (By the way – the second category almost ALWAYS says that the high-pressure stuff has ruined their reputation and cut down on their referrals.)

Here is the problem with using the quote above: it is BS!

Continue reading

pop up message
>